Briansculpt

 

About the Artist
 
My grandfather picked me as an artist at the age of two and a half years. I can still recall drawing the outline of a steam engine with crayon in my left hand and, by the time I got to the cab, I took over with my right hand to complete the drawing down that end. When I was three the family moved from Timaru to Christchurch where I spent my youth.
 
After completing high school I went on to do a graphic art course at the Technical Institute, which I ditched half way into the second year. My uncle, artist Bruce Harvey, got me my first job in the art field, so at the age of nineteen I moved to Auckland to become the layout artist for “Eve”, a new women's magazine. 
 
A few years later I met Judith, who was to become my wife and, while raising twin daughters, Diana and Vanessa, we got on with the task of producing and marketing my work. 
 
For around fifteen years I concentrated mainly on pen and ink drawings done in millions of tiny dots. Each took hundreds of hours to complete and they ranged in topic from New Zealand wildlife and bush to early colonial life. 
 
During this time I sculpted my first bronze, a life sized study of a tuatara. Number 1 of this edition was presented to HRH Prince Philip by the World Wildlife Fund, and Tiritiri Matangi Island sanctuary benefited from funds raised from the sale of the Tuatara bronze.
 
In 1995, I was greatly inspired by our performance in the America's Cup in San Diego and gained the rights to do the official Team New Zealand portrait of NZL32, the winning boat. “Black Magic” was my first colour print edition and I had the honour of giving number 1 to Sir Peter Blake.
 
The Antarctic Heritage Trust commissioned me to do a painting, as a fundraiser for the preservation of the historic huts down on the ice. “I may be some time” is a watercolour study of the interior of Captain Scott’s hut at Cape Evans. Sir Edmund Hillary was presented with one of the limited edition prints of the painting at his book launch "View from the Summit". 
 
More recently, I have been working in the field of New Zealand marine wildlife, painting and sculpting our magnificent marlin and other fish. I found there was keen interest in these and an opportunity to contribute to marine conservation projects.
 
In 2006 I ventured into a new world of fine art digital printing on canvas, with the Moreporks painting, “And what can we do for you?” The print quality is amazing and my collection of editions on canvas has grown from there.
 
Sir Colin Meads gave me his permission for a bronze of him in his heyday and this was launched in 2013 at a lively evening at the Helensville Rugby Club. 
 
I have always taken on a certain amount of commissioned work while producing pieces for limited editions. Recently I completed my largest oil painting to date, the 2 metre by 1 metre canvas of “Rangitoto”, the iconic island that can be clearly seen from many places along Auckland’s east coast.